Live music for intimate wedding celebrations

Do you have a small or intimate wedding celebration coming up? Maybe a wedding ceremony with reduced numbers or a garden party at your own home? If you’re interested in having some live acoustic music at your small event, you can contact me for a bespoke quote using any of the following methods:

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info@guitaristforweddings.co.uk

Tel: 07817 930779
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GuitaristForWeddings/
Instagram: https://instagram.com/thepatmcintyre

Live acoustic music – perfect for smaller celebrations
Photo courtesy of Martin Dabek Photography

It’s early July 2020 as I write this, and we’ve just gone through an extraordinary few months. The Coronavirus lockdown brought our country to an abrupt halt, and of course this meant the postponement (and sadly, cancellation in some cases) of thousands of weddings.

Thankfully, things are slowly starting to reopen, and in England weddings can now take place again! Wonderful news for those that want to tie the knot, and aren’t too worried about having a large party/celebration.

With limited numbers and some extra precautions, weddings are slowly starting to happen again – and the positive news is that regulations are likely to be relaxed further in the coming weeks.

Photo courtesy of Matt at Passion 4 Photos

Live music at smaller weddings

Although it may be a little longer before we can have big evening parties, DJs and live bands, in the short-term smaller celebrations are the way to go!

If you have a wedding coming up this year, chances are you’ve had to downsize. Some ideas I’ve heard floated around for this year’s weddings have included:

  • Small ceremonies with just close friends and family (maybe then a big belated party next year!)
  • A wedding ceremony followed by a reception at their venue, as soon as government guidelines allow – but more than likely with reduced numbers and no evening party.
  • A complete change in plans! A small legal ceremony at a church or registry office, then a garden party in the afternoon/evening with close friends and family – in line with COVID guidelines, of course.
Image courtesy of Martin Dabek Photography

Live acoustic guitar music at smaller weddings/parties

So how does this tie-in with what I do? Well, although the majority of my weddings for 2020 have now postponed until next year, I’m starting to receive a lot of queries from couples looking to go ahead with smaller celebrations this year.

I’m absolutely happy to quote for weddings and small parties from July 2020 onwards – I understand this probably won’t fit in with my traditional pricing structure, so if you have an event coming up and want some live music, pop an enquiry over on my contact page, or via info@guitaristforweddings.co.uk

The addition of a live musician may be exactly what you need to make your day feel more special. If you’re having a small event in your garden for example, you can book me to come along and play some tunes as you eat, or provide the ambience while you relax in the sun with a cold glass of something.

It’s those special touches that make your big day – well, special. You don’t have to have 200 people, a marching band and doves flying down the aisle! The small moments are the things you’ll cherish – like the memory of chatting with your closest loved ones, while you have some fantastic live music to listen to. And hey, if you want a huge party (who doesn’t?!) well, we can do that when all this is over and done with.

Is live music permitted currently?

At the moment, evening celebrations are a no-go in England, but of course guidance is changing all the time so do check the Government website for the latest guidance.

Currently, live music with one singer and instrument may be permitted at ceremonies as long as your venue and registrars etc. are happy with your plans. Taken from the current Government guidance (correct on 9th July 2020) re: singing at wedding ceremonies:

Where required for the marriage or civil partnership, only one individual should be permitted to sing or chant, and the use of plexi-glass screens should be considered to protect guests, as this will further prevent transmission and the screen can be easily cleaned

Personally, I think the plexi-glass screen can be avoided as long as there is plenty of space. I’d suggest at least 5 metres between the performer and any other individuals, more if possible. I also always sing directly into a microphone, which will effectively work as a shield to provide further protection.

Image courtesy of Siobhan Beales Photography

Post-wedding ceremony receptions at wedding venues are not allowed at the moment, although this is likely to change in the near future. Instead, many people are choosing to have a BBQ or small gathering of close friends/family in their garden, in line with COVID guidelines.

If you want a bit of live music to give your small party a lift, acoustic music is a winner. I play covers of many different genres, with my unique guitar/vocal style and my loop pedal magic. Followers of my YouTube channel will be familiar with my loop pedal work, and the live sessions I’ve been streaming online!

Contact me here if you’re interested in having a chat about live music at your intimate event.

www.guitaristforweddings.co.uk
info@guitaristforweddings.co.uk

Tel: 07817 930779
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GuitaristForWeddings/
Instagram: https://instagram.com/thepatmcintyre


Pat McIntyre – live singer and acoustic guitarist for weddings and events, from Bristol, UK.

July 2020 – Coronavirus and it’s impact on Musicians and the Wedding Industry

I write this on a drab, drizzly Saturday afternoon in early July 2020. It’s the 4th July – American Independence day, my parents’ Golden Wedding Anniversary (congratulations Mr & Mrs McIntyre!) and what has been enthusiastically nicknamed “Super Saturday” – the day when UK pubs re-open their doors following the COVID-19 lockdown.

This year has been extraordinary. We’re right in the thick of the Coronavirus disruption, and I think every now and then it’s important to take a step back and look at how quickly everything has happened.

Social-Distancing-P1630991 | Social distancing floor sign du… | Flickr
Social distancing signs in the UK

It was January when we first started hearing about the virus spreading quickly in China. By February, cases had started appearing in Europe and a month later, we in the UK were in full lockdown mode. Four months later and we’ve got used to social distancing, face coverings, zoom calls (endless quizzes…) and of course huge impacts on our careers and personal lives.

The Wedding and Performing Arts industries have been two of the hardest hit. Aren’t I glad then that my job neatly straddles both?!

The New Normal

It’s late afternoon and usually on a Saturday in July I’d be packing my music kit away, having played some live music at a wedding. But this is the “new normal” for those of us affected by the dreaded Coronavirus. For me, this Summer has consisted not of playing music, but mostly of bike rides, DIY (LOTS of DIY!) and working on various projects to keep me busy and looking forward.

Performing at Ocean Kave wedding venue on the North Devon coast
Image courtesy of Venetia Norrington Photography

As a full-time wedding industry professional with one toe in the music industry, I thought it might be interesting to share my personal experience of Coronavirus. Some of you reading this may not realise that music is my full-time profession. Often people assume that I play guitar at weddings on the weekends for a bit of pocket money – not so! This is my livelihood, and it’s come to a dramatic pause this year.

I’ve played music all my life, and I first started making a career out of it roughly 15 years ago. Having performed on the open mic circuit around Bristol regularly, I secured a residency at Illusions Magic Bar on the Clifton Triangle (sadly now consigned to history!) I have fond memories of performing on packed Friday and Saturday evenings.

How I became a wedding musician

I played my first wedding gig around 2010, after someone had seen me performing in Bristol and decided to book me to play at their big day. From that wedding, word of mouth brought me another couple of bookings and it was at that point that I started focusing on playing live music at weddings.

At this point I was working full-time, but I decided to ditch my job in IT a couple of years later (being an outdoors person, I never was very good at the 9-5 office job life). It was quite a dramatic career change – I became a part-time Postman (Postman Pat!), focusing on music at weekends and taking on as many gigs as I could physically manage.

Weekends at that point generally looked like this:

Friday: 5am start for work, returning home around 3pm to snatch a couple of hours sleep before some dinner, then head out to a gig, returning home around 1am.
Saturday: it always took me a while to get to sleep after a gig (musicians will know that “wired” feeling you get for a few hours after a lively performance), so the 5am start always used to hurt the next day! I’d do my shift, back home to sleep for a few hours and out until late again. Sundays were generally a write-off!

Acoustic guitar at the wedding reception

Building the business and going full-time

By 2015, the wedding business was really starting to take off. It was clear that there was demand for high-quality live music at weddings, and frustratingly I was now having to turn away work. Getting a weekend off as a postie was like gold dust, and it got to the point whereby I was declining more wedding bookings than I was taking on.

In early 2016 I made the leap into full-time self employment. A scary time, but I dived in at the deep end, doing as much promotion as I could, attending every wedding show that would have me, and increasing my online presence. Bookings started coming in thick and fast – from 30 or so weddings in my first year, this doubled in 2017, eventually leading to my busiest year in 2019 when I played at 72 wonderful weddings!

And then… lockdown

Although Summer 2020 was looking as busy as ever, it was a slow start to the year with just one wedding in February. It was a memorable day – a huge storm blew in that weekend and I was down on the Devon coast. The journey took an hour or two longer than usual, as 60mph winds and torrential rain battered the motorway. When I arrived at the venue, the videographer warned me that the storm had blown his car down the road, the winds were so strong!

Little did I know that wild day in Devon would be my last wedding performance for some time. It was about to be my busiest March and April ever, with lots of wonderful Spring weddings to look forward to – then all of a sudden everything ground to a halt with the lockdown announcement.

Long walks during lockdown

2020 weddings

Up to now all weddings have been forced to cancel or postpone since lockdown, but there is some light at the end of the tunnel with the reopening of small wedding ceremonies.

The government’s latest guidance around ceremonies has been a little muddled, but I am seeing weddings start to happen in England – finally some positive news! I’ll write a separate blog on intimate weddings, and if/how live music can happen at these celebrations so keep an eye out for that.

Adapting to the current climate

Despite weddings legally now being allowed, the restrictions and uncertainty have forced many couples into making the difficult decision to postpone until next year – some couples are even finding that dates for their venue are so limited, they’ve had to move their date as far as 2022.

Although I’d dearly love to be returning to work, I don’t blame anyone for postponing their big day. I’d be doing the same if it was my wedding. Currently there’s a limit of 30 people who can attend – and this appears to include staff/suppliers, so in reality the number of guests is going to be significantly lower than this.

Some peculiar, arbitrary rules (including the particularly bizarre advice to wash hands before exchanging rings – as if the couple haven’t had contact with one another before the big day?!) have been advised. Whether this will happen in practice seems unlikely, but it’s certainly enough to put people off. You want to enjoy your big day after all, not be worrying constantly whether rules are being broken. I’m hopeful some of these restrictions will be further lifted soon, so that we can get back to some kind of normal sooner rather than later.

Performing at the Stone Barn in the Cotswolds

Postponements and moving dates

For those of us in the wedding industry, I can’t lie – it’s been a headache, and I really feel for the poor wedding couples having to rearrange everything. There’s no “one size fits all” approach to postponing or changing dates unfortunately. Every venue, wedding supplier and wedding couple has their own challenges and personal situations to face.

I can only speak from my own personal experience. This has been a huge learning curve for me, having never dealt with anything on this scale before. The end result is basically that I’m postponing dates for all my couples without any charge or penalties, unless it’s for 2022 or beyond in which case a small yearly price increase applies.

In the unfortunate event that a couple are only able to supply me with one alternative date which I’m already booked for, I’m doing my best to work around this and try to come up with alternatives. For example, evening live music rather than daytime music. Sometimes I’m able to travel to two venues in one day, so this has worked out well in some cases.

I’m trying to be as flexible as possible – none of this is anyone’s fault and it’s really important to remember the stress and impact this has on everyone.

The beautiful Aldwick Estate, near the Mendip hills

The impact on couples and wedding businesses

If you’re reading this, chances are you’re either a couple due to get married, or a business within the wedding sector. I’m a sole trader, and I deal with all my couples on a one-to-one basis (no agencies or middlemen) so part of my job is to have great personal relationships with my couples. At the same time I’ve built a strong network of friends and contacts within the wedding business, so I’m in a good position to see things from both sides.

There’s no two ways about it – this is difficult for everyone. When lockdown was announced my phone and inbox exploded with enquiries and I, along with most people, had a really tough week mentally. It was overwhelming and I think many of us got somewhat lost in our own heads. I certainly know I was guilty of this.

As time has gone on, the extremes of emotion have calmed down a little. The financial situation as a small business remains extremely precarious, but personally I’m doing all I can to keep things moving forward, staying as positive as possible and staying in regular contact with my couples and fellow industry friends.

Empathy and patience

I feel that it’s more important than ever to have empathy for the person you’re speaking with. At the moment we’re mostly communicating via text – emails, whatsapp, instant messaging. You never know what state the person is in mentally, and what their personal circumstances are, and this is always exacerbated by communicating solely via technology.

If a bride or groom seems angry or upset with me, I try to take a step back now and wonder why it may appear this way. Maybe they’ve had a terrible morning dealing with rearranging their guest list… maybe they have loved ones that can no longer make it… maybe a family member is ill… maybe their financial situation is reaching tipping point and they’re having to think about cancelling their wedding. It could literally be any number of things – and of course, it can often just come down to misinterpreting how the email/message is worded. Sometimes a perfectly friendly email can come across differently, depending on the language used and the mood of the person reading it.

In the same way, I’d ask that brides/grooms have patience with us as wedding suppliers – particularly people like myself who are sole traders and deal with every aspect of the business. From admin, business and promotion, right through to accounts and of course delivering the service on the big day, us small business owners have a lot on our plates. I don’t always get everything right! But I like to think that in the cases where I have got things wrong during this pandemic, I’ve recognised my shortcomings and have learnt from them.

Looking forward to more amazing moments like these!
Image courtesy of River Lane Photography

Moving forward

Well, this has turned into quite a rambling blog! It was intended as a short comment on the wedding and music industries (I didn’t even get on to the Performing Arts industry, which has been hit even harder), but it turns out that I had more to say than I thought.

I hope some of this has made for interesting reading, and maybe given a small insight into what’s gone on behind the scenes in the wedding industry for small businesses like mine.

Every time I get a set back, I try to think: onwards and upwards! I’m a naturally optimistic person, and I have total faith that things will get back to normal sooner rather than later. Wonderful wedding celebrations will return, couples will be able to have their dream days once again and you know what – they’ll mean more than ever.

I love every wedding I play at, but going forward I really think we’ll cherish every moment that little bit more. Every interaction we have, every special moment shared – everything is going to feel so much more meaningful on the back of this pandemic.

There’s always room for hope and optimism. I can’t wait to get back to work, and I hope that if you have a wedding coming up, you’ve made peace with either postponing or maybe having to scale things back a touch. Whatever happens, let’s enjoy every moment of the celebrations when they come around, and always remember the most important things in life.

I wish everyone all the very best throughout this – stay safe and well, and we’ll get through it together!


Written by Pat McIntyre – singer/guitarist and wedding musician based in Bristol, UK.

www.guitaristforweddings.co.uk

Coronavirus – Update 17/04/20

An update on the current COVID-19 pandemic for my current wedding couples. With the situation changing so rapidly, please keep an eye on my blog, Facebook and Instagram – but here’s an update on my current policy re: postponements/cancellations (as of 17th April 2020).

With the lockdown now extended until at least 7th May 2020, I have now moved or sadly cancelled all my upcoming weddings between now and then.

I still have a lot of weddings booked in from July onwards, and I’m very aware that it’s an uncertain time for any couples getting married this Summer. At the moment, we have to rely on the government’s advice. I feel that it’s very unlikely weddings will be going ahead during May or June, but none of us have a crystal ball so it’s very difficult to make any decisions at the moment.

Here is a summary of my current policy re: postponements or cancellations:

  • Any weddings that cannot take place through no fault of the wedding couple (ie. government lockdown, venue closed, or other legitimate reasons), I will rearrange to any date of your choosing at no extra cost, assuming I’m available.
  • If I’m not available for your new date, sadly this will amount to a cancellation of my services and my cancellation terms will apply, as stated in your contract. No refunds will be issued, and the outstanding balance may be due – depending on how far ahead your wedding is.
  • In the event of the above point applying, I would ask that couples to claim on their wedding insurance for any losses.
  • If your wedding is coming up later this Summer, but you’ve decided to postpone, this is totally understandable as things are very uncertain. This will amount to a cancellation of your current booking with me, so you will need to rebook with me if you wish to secure my services on your new date. This will unfortunately forfeit any deposit/reservation fee already paid.

This is an outline of my main terms/policies during this epidemic. I hope that everyone considers these to be fair and just – I’m trying to be as flexible as I can, whilst finding a way of continuing to run my small business which has taken a big hit.

I think an element of flexibility is required from both myself and my wedding couples at this time – if you have any questions about the above, or any difficulties with finances or payments, please do discuss this with me and I’ll do all I can to help.

You can contact me with any queries on info@guitaristforweddings.co.uk

Stay safe and well everyone – I for one am looking forward to all the amazing celebrations we’ll have once we’re on the other side of this!

Pat

Coronavirus – a wedding musician’s thoughts

Well – I’ve been putting it off, but I guess it’s about time I addressed the elephant in the room. COVID-19 is here to stay for a little while, and I’m sure we’re all tired of discussing it, hearing opinions about it and watching the 24/7 news coverage. However, it would seem remiss of me not to write a few words about how this thing is affecting my business and the longer term implications.

I’ll write a separate blog on the specifics of what this means for my wedding couples, but the rest of this blog will be more of a personal take on the situation, and a little look back at what has happened, and how quickly it all escalated.

In the middle of this strange and unsettling time, there’s also a few positives to gleam from it, so I’ll end this blog post with some of things that have picked my spirits up during the Coronavirus outbreak.

This thing has moved so quickly, it’s been hard to keep track! The last couple of months have been bizarre, so let’s rewind to the start of year and remember how it unfolded…

January

The Coronavirus outbreak hits China hard, with severe lockdowns announced. The first UK nationals to contract the virus are confirmed, but are quarantined to prevent the spread of the disease. Britons returning from Wuhan are placed in isolation when returning to the country, and we saw video footage on the news of people in hotel rooms trying to keep their spirits up, whilst confined to the four walls of a Premier Inn for 14 days!

File:People wearing masks in Hong Kong for Wuhan coronavirus ...

At this point, I don’t think many of us acknowledged how serious this was going to become. We watched it happening elsewhere, not realising that it was absolutely inevitable that the same would happen on our crowded island.

February

In February, the national mood here in the UK started to shift a bit as the virus began to spread in our country, on a small scale at first. It seems crazy now to think back to what I was doing in February, and how unconcerned we all were about it!

I’d had a busy January of wedding fairs and meetings with couples, and was looking forward to another manic year ahead. In mid-February I played at my first wedding of 2020 down in Plymouth, in the middle of Storm Ciara. It was a hair-raising journey down the M5, and it was still blowing a gale and raining just as hard on my trip back home later that evening. It was a late finish anyway, but the slow journey time due to the storm meant I didn’t get in until gone 3am.

File:Ciara 2020-02-07 1800Z.jpg - Wikimedia Commons

The wind was blowing so hard down on the coast that the videographer went out to get something from his car, only to find his vehicle 20 metres or so down the road from where he left it!

Anyway, back to Coronavirus, and I although I remember hearing about it in the news, I hadn’t even considered the disruption that lay ahead. I, like the rest of the country, was just carrying on as normal. Little did I know that February’s wedding would be the last wedding I would play at for some time…

March

Well, March was quite the month, wasn’t it? This is when it all started happening, and the nightmare became a reality.

In Mid-March, the number of UK cases started growing quickly. In Italy, the numbers were staggering. Hundreds of deaths per day. Tens of thousands of cases. Spain looked to be on a similar trajectory, and other European countries were being hit hard. It was clear that this thing was about to hit us with the same severity – if there’s one thing we’ve learnt, this virus doesn’t discriminate. Celebrities, footballers and other public figures were testing positive – it all started to become very real.

The immediate threat seemed to be to older people, and people with underlying health conditions. A letter was sent out to all over-70’s in the UK asking people to self-isolate. The government stopped short of announcing a full lockdown at this point, and for those of us in the wedding industry, this was probably the hardest time, as everything was just so uncertain.

No lockdown yet… but could weddings go ahead?

The UK government started holding a daily briefing, and advised people to avoid social situations whilst limiting their contact with other people. Steer clear of pubs, clubs and other public gatherings and work from home where possible, we were told.

But what did this mean for weddings? Our industry was thrown into chaos as us suppliers started receiving (understandably) panicked phone calls and emails from brides/grooms who wanted to know how we were reacting to it, and what they should do.

Confusion reigned supreme and there was no guidance as to what we should do. Registrars started downsizing their ceremonies and venues pondered whether to close their doors, some taking the difficult decision to close. Brides and grooms didn’t know whether their Spring/Summer weddings would be able to go ahead. The financial implications were huge – people stood to lose a lot of money, as it looked like insurance companies wouldn’t pay out unless the country officially went into lockdown.

It’s hard to emphasise how stressful this was for everyone. I was completely overwhelmed by enquiries, most of which were understanding and perfectly reasonable, but I was juggling trying to do the right thing on a human level whilst making decisions that would seriously affect my small business. I had a few moments where the anxiety and stress hit me really hard, and I’m not ashamed to say that I cried in the arms of my amazingly supportive wife on more than one occasion!

She, meanwhile, was dealing with managing a theatre school and was due to put on two big shows, just as the situation was escalating. With roughly 150 children and their parents to deal with, a team of teachers to manage and a rapidly changing situation, she was also near the end of her tether. Our self-employed businesses faced an uncertain future.

And then, the announcement…

Glued to our TVs, phones and tablets, we watched as our usually jovial PM stern-facedly announced that we were now entering a period of lockdown.

As I watched, I recall a chill running through me. The implications of this were huge. We’re incredibly lucky in the UK live in a free society. This was a completely unprecedented thing – we’re being asked to stay home and isolate ourselves. No exceptions, we’re not even able to see our friends and families. All these things we take for granted, suddenly our entire perspective changed and we realised – this thing is much bigger than any of us.

April

So that brings us up to the present day. It’s April 13th as I write this, and after the fast-moving, ever-changing situation in mid to late March, it now feels as if things have settled somewhat, in my little world at least.

After the initial shock of the announcement wore off, I felt a strange feeling of relief take hold. At least now we had some certainty. Weddings would be postponed during this lockdown period, now it was a case of working out the logistics.

After initially only announcing financial help for the UK’s employed workers, the government eventually launched a scheme for self-employed workers like myself. Although this will not come close to replacing my lost revenue, it will at least mean that I can continue doing this as a full-time job, assuming that we do get back to some kind of normal before too long.

The tone of my conversations with wedding couples changed from panic and uncertainty to a resigned acceptance. If there’s one thing we’re good at in Britain, it’s our “stiff upper lip” attitude. It’ll all be ok in the end! So some weddings have to be moved – it’s not the end of the world. We’ll deal with it, and maybe it’ll be a bit later than planned, but these celebrations are going to be all the more meaningful when they end up taking place.


My lockdown life

Other than having no work at the weekends, lockdown hasn’t actually had a huge impact on my day-to-day life. Yes, it’s been strange not going out of the house or seeing anyone, but it’s not been a huge change as I do most of my work from home anyway.

To finish this blog post I thought it would be nice to reflect on some of the positive aspects to come out of this peculiar situation we find ourselves in.

Long walks and quality time with Mrs Mac!

It’s been ironic really that since this lockdown was announced, we’ve had an almost unprecedented spell of glorious, sunny Spring weather. I can’t really remember a period in March/April when it’s been so warm for so long. We’ve enjoyed heading out and enjoying the lovely parks in our local area, and have dined al fresco in our small garden.

In a world where work tends to dominate everything we do, it’s been really nice to slow the pace of life down a little. We’ve done lots of gardening, done odd jobs around the home that have been put off for weeks/months, and done an almost unnatural amount of baking! I love cooking, so it’s been nice to put lots of care and attention into creating delicious dinners, and we’ve tried to eat as healthily as possible.

An exercise a day keeps Corona away

Well, that’s not entirely true, obviously, but I do think it’s SUPER important to get outside and get your one form of exercise in for the day. Staying fit and healthy will definitely help keep your immune system in check, and getting exercise does wonders for your mental health. Whether it’s a run, bike ride or a walk in the park, it’s important to get the blood pumping and get those endorphins flowing.

I’m so glad the government stopped short of a complete lockdown and allowed us out at least once a day for some fresh air. I’ve enjoyed runs down by our local river, and many of you will know that I’m a passionate cyclist so have been out most days on my bike.

The distance covered has been a little shorter than usual, as I think it’s important not to stray too far from home, but it’s been beautiful getting out on my bike with hardly any traffic, lovely clean air and some stunning sunshine.

Cycling through the Cotswolds on empty roads during the lockdown

Getting the creative juices flowing…

One thing that’s been a huge positive from having more time on my hands has been sitting down and making a list of things I want to achieve. I’ve started planning projects that I’ve just not had time for in the last few years! One of these includes FINALLY releasing a solo album of my original songs – long overdue. I’ll be writing, re-writing, finishing off and recording some brand new songs over the coming months, so keep your eyes peeled for that!

#tuesdaytune LIVE!

One thing that’s been brilliant throughout the isolation period has been the use of technology to stay connected. Using apps like Zoom, Houseparty, Whatsapp and FaceTime we’ve all been video calling each other to check in with friends and family. Services that we take for granted usually have become essential methods of communication.

Many of us performers have taken to live streaming performances from our own homes. While it will never take the place of a proper live performance, I’ve found it a really fun way to interact with people – seeing the comments come in and having people request songs in real time has been a joy! I really enjoyed my first #tuesdaytune live last week, and will be broadcasting again tomorrow at 7pm on Facebook live. Here’s an HD recording of last Tuesday’s performance:

Other creative projects on my list include recording the Acoustic Wedding Album volume 3 (vol 1 and 2 available here) and re-learning the piano! I’ve launched a brand new website:

www.pianoforweddings.co.uk

I actually learnt to play piano before I taught myself guitar, so I’ve wanted to improve my piano skills for a long time. Now seems like the perfect opportunity to take some lessons and hopefully get myself up to a standard where I can start performing at weddings. I love the idea of being able to combine both instruments and give more flexibility to my wedding performances.

I’m hoping to launch this website properly in 2021, and maybe start tinkling on the ivories at my first wedding!

Community spirit and the kindness of humanity

It’s been truly heartwarming to see some of the amazing tales of kindness and compassion as a result of this crisis. In all walks of life, people have been doing amazing things, from large fundraisers to small, but equally important gestures like checking your elderly neighbour is ok.

The NHS asked the general public whether they’d be willing to volunteer to help with everyday tasks, and were overwhelmed at the incredible support received! Within hours, hundreds of thousands of people signed up to register their interest in helping out. At the last count, it was about three-quarters of a million people – incredible!

The #clapforcarers movement has been wonderful – a show of appreciation for our incredible NHS health workers who are literally putting their lives on the line during this. These people are the true heroes, and once again we appreciate how incredibly thankful we are to have free universal healthcare in this country, and amazing people working to save lives.

It’s also been lovely to see the outpouring of love towards usually undervalued workers like supermarket staff, delivery drivers and bin men/women, to name but a few. As a former postie, I know how important it is that these services are still running. These brilliant people are literally keeping our country moving during a time when everything else is grinding to a halt, and retaining a sense of normality when things are far from normal.

And finally…

Well, I’ve rambled on far longer than planned, but in honesty it’s been quite cathartic articulating my feelings! I do feel that it’s a time when we all need to talk this through, and make time for each other.

If any of my brides/grooms (or wedding industry friends!) want a chat, do pick up the phone and we’ll have a chinwag.

Take care, stay safe and look after one another.

Pat


Pat McIntyre – singer/acoustic guitarist for weddings. Bristol, UK
www.guitaristforweddings.co.uk

Goo Goo Dolls – Iris – Acoustic cover / free download

In these strange times we’re going through, I’ve been looking for music solutions for wedding couples getting married in the next couple of months. Many couples were still looking to go ahead with smaller ceremonies, but with the lockdown now announced by the government, even these small ceremonies have now been cancelled.

Well – I’m still going to go ahead and make some new recordings. I have some time on my hands, after all!

This recording was made for Craig & Fiona’s ceremony, which was due to take place this weekend. I thought I’d share this with you all because… well, why not? We all need music in our life at the moment!

I’m going to include this track on the Acoustic Wedding Album vol. 3 – coming soon (I’ll be recording this Spring/Summer now, as I’m going to have much more time on my hands than expected), but for now you can listen and download the track here:

You can either play the track directly from Soundcloud, or download the file for your own use using the download button above.

The download link will expire in a couple of weeks so grab your free download while you can!

Stay safe everyone – wishing you all the best at this testing time.

Pat

New wedding songs – Winter 2019/2020

2019 was another incredible year – my busiest yet in fact, with 73 wonderful weddings! I always encourage new song requests and generally learn a new song or two per wedding.

I’ve been going through recent special requests from wedding couples, and have added the following songs to the list:

As you can see, I get some pretty diverse requests! Maybe this list will help inspire your perfect wedding song?

Here’s to another year of learning new songs… if you’ve booked me for your wedding, you can make your selections and special requests on the online form here.

Could this be the big wedding song for 2020?

Wedding music! It’s a tricky one to get right. Everyone’s looking for that perfect composition to walk down the aisle to, or a truly meaningful song to make the first dance memorable. The old classics still live on, but occasionally a new song comes out that just fits perfectly for that special moment.

It’s only January, but my early pick for 2020 is this brilliant track by the uber-talented Tom Walker. It’s called “Better Half of Me” and you can hear my acoustic version here:

Tom Walker has such a strong, rich tone to his voice and he really puts some power into his vocals! My style is definitely a lot more laid back, so I wanted to put together a relaxed version of this song which would perfectly fit a wedding ceremony or first dance.

I can just imagine that moment when the groom first sets eyes on his bride walking down the aisle, with the beautiful lyrics of the song: “I’d have all I need… if you were standing right in front of me… I finally see what it means to be complete”

Fits perfectly, don’t you think?

This tune is definitely going to be a top pick this year I think, and I can’t wait to play it at weddings in 2020!



Written by Pat McIntyre – singer & acoustic guitarist for weddings and other events based in Bristol, UK.

www.guitaristforweddings.co.uk 

New song requests

17th June 2019
Blog – Special Requests and thoughts on learning songs

People often comment on how many songs there are to choose from my repertoire… I think at the last count it was around 400! The main question I get asked is “how do you remember so many songs?!” Well… I do have a knack of remembering songs – I’m lucky that they just kind of stick in my head. If only learning information for exams at school and University was so easy! In fact, I often think now that if I’d memorised information for exams in the form of songs, I’d probably have found revising much easier!

However, I must confess, I do also have an iPad with all my song lyrics on. So in the event that my mind does go blank, I have a backup. What did we do before technology eh? In my case, probably mumble through the song and make up some words that sounded somewhere near right – ha ha!

Singing Jo & Lee’s special request “Rule The World” by Take That – with the help of the hen party on backing vocals! Photo courtesy of River Lane Photography

Special requests for weddings

I always encourage special requests. I know some bands/musicians have a set repertoire, but I like to always keep things fresh rather than playing the same songs at every event. It helps keep me sharp, and plus – learning new songs is good fun!

It does take a little while to learn a new song though. It can depend on many factors… if it’s a song I know, but haven’t ever played, and the chords aren’t too challenging – then I can probably learn it in an hour or two. However if it’s a song I haven’t heard before it can take a lot longer… add in some jazzy new chords that I’ve never used before and it can take a good couple of days to master a song.

If it’s a brand new song to me, I’ll listen to it a few times, then start working out how to play it on guitar. I’ll have a little go at learning it, then leave it for a few hours or overnight. This gets the song into my head, then when I come back to it, hopefully it’s sitting there somewhere in my memory bank, then it’s a case of repeating and practicing until perfect!

Playing at the Great Tythe Barn, Tetbury. Thanks to Martin Dabek Photography for the image.

So, as you could probably imagine, it can take up a fair bit of time. I usually ask for 3-5 requests for weddings max (depending on how long I’m booked for). With 12 weddings this June, you can probably get an idea of how much time I spend learning and perfecting new songs. I love it though – I’m pretty sure there’s much worse jobs to have!

Some recent special requests…

Here’s an example of some songs I’ve learnt recently – this will give you an idea of how diverse the requests can be!

  • “A Million Dreams” from the Greatest Showman
  • Coldplay & Chainsmokers – Something Just Like This
  • Adele – Skyfall
  • Bon Jovi – Thank You For Loving Me
  • Calum Scott – You Are The Reason
  • Lionel Richie – My Destiny
  • Fleetwood Mac – Everywhere
  • Heartland – I Loved Her First
  • Lucky Jim – Lovely To Me
  • Something In The Water – Brooke Fraser
  • Take That – Rule The World
  • Lonestar – Amazed
  • Billy Joel – Just The Way You Are
  • Louis Armstrong – What A Wonderful World
  • Katrina & The Waves – Walking on Sunshine
  • Biffy Clyro – Mountains
  • The Gaslight Anthem – Blue Jeans & White T-Shirts
  • Jack Johnson – Upside Down
  • Bryan Adams – I Think About You

If you’ve already booked me to play at your wedding, you can use the online song choices form here to submit your requests. I need at least a month’s notice for any special requests, so that I have plenty of time to learn them.

And with that, it’s time to add all these new tracks to the repertoire! Bye for now…



Written by Pat McIntyre – singer & acoustic guitarist for weddings and other events based in Bristol, UK.

www.guitaristforweddings.co.uk 

Wedding Ceremony Music explained

Blog: How to choose music for your marriage ceremony

I think wedding music is one of those things that can sometimes get a little overlooked during the planning phase. As a singer and guitarist, I speak with lots of brides and grooms who are huge music fans and know exactly what they’re after! But for every couple that have it all figured out, there’s another couple that don’t know where to start. I find the same questions tend to pop up again and again, so here’s my quick guide to picking your perfect ceremony music.

How many songs should we choose for the marriage ceremony?

Undoubtedly the most common question I get asked! This can vary, depending on whether you’re having a civil ceremony, a church wedding or an alternative celebration – such as a humanist ceremony, for example. Typically, you’ll always need some music during the processional (walking down the aisle), the signing of the register and the recessional (exit of the married couple).

The civil ceremony

A civil ceremony is a non-religious marriage ceremony. Most civil ceremonies will have:

  • One song during the processional (walk down the aisle / bridal entrance)
  • Three songs during the signing of the register
  • One song during the recessional (exit of the married couple)

The main varying factor here is the signing of the register. Usually what happens is – the couple sign the legal marriage register, then shortly afterwards the registrars bring out a blank register. This allows the couple to have a ‘fake’ signing, and the photographer can take some pictures of the happy couple sealing the deal! Photos of the legal marriage register are not allowed, which is why they bring out a blank register for the fake signing. You may also invite your guests forward to get some snaps at this point, so depending on how long this takes, it’s usually up to about 10 minutes, so three songs is usually bang on the money.

Church/religious wedding ceremonies

Religious ceremonies are a little different, so you should liaise with the person conducting the ceremony. I can only comment on Christian ceremonies here, but in my experience you would usually have:

  • One song during the processional
  • Two or three hymns for the congregation to sing
  • Two or three pieces of music during the signing of the register
  • One song during the recessional

Often the songs will played by an organist at the church, however some ceremonies are more flexible and may allow a live musician such as myself. I’ve played at a number of church weddings – sometimes I’ll play all the music (other than the hymns), and sometimes I may alternate with the organist.

Humanist and other alternative ceremonies

For those couples that don’t want to go down the more traditional route, the options are limitless for creating their own perfect ceremony. Humanist and alternative ceremonies don’t hold any legal status, so often couples will choose to tie the knot elsewhere beforehand, maybe the day before.

These ceremonies are usually conducted by a celebrant, or maybe even a friend or family member who is confident talking in front of large groups of people! In terms of music, it really can follow any path you want, but typically there will be songs during the processional and recessional, just as in a civil or religious ceremony.

A popular option is to have guests sing along to a song or two during the ceremony, kind of like an alternative hymn – more on this in the hints and tips section below.

Other interesting ideas I’ve seen include handfasting, tree planting and sand ceremonies. Often during these rituals, I’ll play a lovely chilled acoustic song or two!

 

Hints and tips for choosing your ceremony music

Religious content

If you’re having a civil ceremony, remember this means that it’s not a religious service so your music must reflect that. Your song lyrics must have no religious content whatsoever. Most registrars will ask you to submit your music choices to them a couple of months before the ceremony, so just check through the words before sending them off.

Wedding guest singalongs

This is becoming an increasingly popular idea – throwing a song or two into the wedding ceremony for the guests to sing along to, maybe as an alternative to a reading.

It’s a great idea in theory – kind of like a modern day hymn – but you have to be really careful that it doesn’t fail and become a bit of a damp squib. Having done this a few times, I’ve seen this work with varying levels of success, so these would be my tips if you’re planning to get everyone singing from the same song sheet!

  • Choose a REALLY well-known song, with a big, easy singalong chorus that even if they don’t know, they’ll pick up quickly. For example – All You Need Is Love by the Beatles is absolutely perfect.
  • Keep it upbeat and fun. Don’t go for a slow song – you’ll need something that will keep the energy flowing.
  • Make it short! Don’t choose a 6 minute epic… everyone will lose interest. Around 2 minutes is the sweet spot. If I’m playing the song live, I can adapt it and shorten it as necessary by removing long intros/outros, cutting verses etc. If you’re playing the song through a phone/iPad, it’s a bit more tricky but you can arrange for someone to fade it down at an appropriate point.
  • Print off the lyrics onto your wedding programme, so that everyone knows what they’re singing. Even better, have the lyrics on a screen up front (maybe tricky to organise but not impossible!) – when people’s heads are up and not looking down at a sheet, their voices will project and it will sound so much better!
  • Ask someone super-confident to be a bit of a ringleader to get everyone going. If your registrar says “ok, everyone is going to sing a song now”, chances are people will be less-than-enthusiastic and will mumble quietly into their lyric sheets. Instead, ask the registrar to “hand over to (person) who will lead us through a singalong to (song title)”. Ask that person to stand up at the front, sing as loudly as they can and get everyone involved! Also ask all the guests who can to stand – people tend to sing more enthusiastically when stood up rather than sat down.
  • Similar to the last point, another idea is to practice the songs on the hen or stag party, and have the hens or stags up front at the ceremony leading the song. A bride recently mentioned to me that this was what they were going to do – I think this is a great idea!
  • Finally, and this is more of a hunch, but I think this will probably only work well with a live musician who can interact with the group. Just playing a song via a phone is probably not going to get everyone to engage as well with the idea.

Pre-ceremony music

There will usually be 15-20 minutes before the marriage ceremony itself, during which guests will take their seats and settle before the big moment. This is a nice time to have a bit of background music on. Often your venue will provide some light music. If booked for the ceremony, I will play some live music during this time which may include some instrumental and some vocal music.

It’s great to have a live musician such as myself during this part of the day, as we can be flexible with how long to play for – particularly handy if the bride is fashionably late! To read more about my wedding ceremony, drinks reception and other live music options, have a look at my pricing page where everything is explained.

So there you have it – that’s the basics of wedding ceremony music covered. If you have any questions, feel free to drop me a line on info@guitaristforweddings.co.uk – even if you haven’t booked me for your wedding, I’ll be glad to help! It’s what I do 🙂

The trickiest bit, of course, is which songs to choose… that’s a harder one to help with, but I have written some blogs on the subject which you can check out below:

https://www.guitaristforweddings.co.uk/top-10-wedding-ceremony-dance-songs/

https://www.guitaristforweddings.co.uk/unusual-wedding-songs/

https://www.guitaristforweddings.co.uk/100-wedding-ceremony-songs/

I’ll be adding some new selections for 2019 very soon, so keep your eyes out on my blog page.



Published 8th May 2019 by Pat McIntyre – singer & guitarist and professional musician for weddings based in Bristol.

This article is based on UK wedding/marriage ceremonies.

For more information about my live wedding music services, please visit www.guitaristforweddings.co.uk

A guide to signing the PDF contract electronically

Image result for pdfA slightly different blog post today – a quick guide to some easy ways to sign PDFs without printing and scanning them.

When you book me in, I’ll send a full legally binding contract to ensure that everything is agreed and in writing. With the technological advances in smartphones and tablets, it’s now very quick and easy to sign the contract on your device and email it back to me.

I encourage everyone to email me the contract where possible – paper copies via post are still fine, but when I receive a paper copy I’ll then digitise it and destroy the paper copy – so it makes sense just to receive it digitally in the first place! With the advent of GDPR, it’s harder now to store paper securely in line with the regulations – much easier to keep it in secure digital format.

Method 1 – Apple devices such as iPhone and iPad

The latest version of iOS makes it very simple to sign PDFs directly from your phone or tablet.

Open the PDF contract attached from your email and tap the ‘markup’ button (looks like a pen).

This allows you to write directly onto the PDF. Zoom in to the signature strip on page 2 and sign.

 


When you’ve signed on the line, tap ‘Done’ then tap ‘Reply All’.

This will attach the signed PDF into a new email which you can send back to me.

Done!

 

 

Method 2 – Adobe Fill & Sign App

This is one I haven’t tried personally, but I’ve been told this is an easy way of filling in PDFs directly from your phone or tablet. It’s available on both Apple and Android devices:

Use the sign documents apphttps://acrobat.adobe.com/uk/en/mobile/fill-sign-pdfs.html

 

 

 

Laptops, Chromebooks and other devices…

A little more complicated, so I’ll defer to people who know what they’re talking about!

https://www.howtogeek.com/164668/how-to-electronically-sign-documents-without-printing-and-scanning-them/

 

 

 

Printing… scanning… and paper copies

If you don’t fancy trying the electronic method, you can of course just print the contract and sign it by hand. Once signed, you can either scan the signature page or take a photo of it (as long as it’s clear and legible), then return to me via email.

And finally… you could even post the contract to me! Remember the days when we used pen, paper and the post box?! Ha ha! That’s still absolutely fine. As mentioned in the intro, I do destroy paper copies after I’ve digitised them and stored them securely using online cloud storage. This is due to the new GDPR regulations – it’s very important to store personal data in a responsible way, and paper copies with name and addresses can easily get into the wrong hands.

 

 

published 13th March 2019